Tutorials

A series of tutorials will be held in conjunction with RE'16 to develop skills in and advance awareness of requirements engineering practices. Tutorials will be held before the main conference on Monday-Tuesday, September 12-13, 2016.

Monday, September 12, 2016 Flyer
T01 Product Line Strategy Choices and their Impact on Feature Management (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
T02 Writing better requirements with EARS+ (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
T03 Effective User Survey Design and Data Analysis (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
T04 User Story Best Practices: Requirements in Agile Context (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 Flyer
T05 Global Requirements Engineering (Half-day - Morning) A4 | US Letter
T06 Security Requirements Engineering (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
T07 Modeling and Analysis with the User Requirements Notation 2.0: Features, Goals, and Scenarios (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
T08 Writing Good Requirements (Full-day) A4 | US Letter
T09 Applying Model Driven Engineering and Domain Specific Languages to Requirements Engineering (Half-day - Morning) A4 | US Letter
T10 Variability-Oriented Requirements Engineering (Half-day - Afternoon) A4 | US Letter
T11 Product Management Essentials (Half-day - Afternoon) A4 | US Letter

T01 - Product Line Strategy Choices and their Impact on Feature Management

Successful software product line organizations evolve by ensuring they align their forecasts of market trends and their ability to influence those trends with their product line strategy and in turn ensure their engineers understand this alignment. Without careful management of that alignment over time the execution of a product line strategy becomes far less effective. This tutorial discusses how strategy choices impact on engineering decisions with a particular focus on how features are developed and managed over time. It draws on many years’ product line experience at Nokia, Danfoss and Roche Diagnostics. At the end of this tutorial a participant will be able to:

  • present an overview of business and product line engineering strategy options
  • describe how strategy choices influence decisions to make/buy features
  • show how strategy choice affects the implementation of feature variability management
  • discuss how planned/unplanned organizational factors can affect business-engineering strategy alignment.

This tutorial is aimed at requirements engineers, software engineers, project managers, faculty staff, and PhD students who want to learn about effective modern requirements reuse. You should have an intermediate knowledge of requirements engineering and the problems of developing medium to large computer-based systems. You will not need to know the detail of domains used for the case studies. Sufficient introduction will be provided.

Date
Monday, September 12, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Mike Mannion
Glasgow Caledonian University, United Kingdom

Professor Mike Mannion is Vice-Principal (Research) at Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. His research interests include product-line engineering, software engineering and engineering education. He is a Chartered Engineer, a Charted Information Practitioner and a member of the British Computer Society, IEEE and ACM, published more than 50 papers and run more than 20 tutorials.


Juha Savolainen
Research Center for Management Informatics, Belgium

Dr. Juha Savolainen is Head of Software Architecture at Roche Diagnostics International Ltd, Zurich, Switzerland. He has extensive experience in working closely with numerous product lines in helping them to manage and realize variability. His main research interests include requirements engineering, software architectures and product line development. He has published more than 50 papers.

Back to overiew

T02 - Writing better requirements with EARS+

Easy Approach to Requirements Syntax (EARS) has been shown to drastically reduce or even eliminate the main problems typically associated with natural language (NL) requirements and is widely used in academia and in a range of industries. The enhanced EARS+ notation allows requirements authors to add more detail where necessary, whilst maintaining the readability of textual requirements.

Black box system requirements are usually written in unconstrained NL, which is inherently imprecise. During system development, problems in system requirements often propagate to lower levels. This creates unnecessary volatility and risk, which impact programme schedule and cost. To mitigate this problem, there is a need to provide simple, practical guidance for authors of NL requirements. EARS is a notation for authoring NL requirements through the application of a template with an underlying ruleset. EARS has proved popular with practitioners because it is lightweight, there is little training overhead, no specialist tool is required and the resultant requirements are easy to read. EARS is especially effective for requirements authors who have to write requirements in English, but whose first language is not English.

In practice, requirements authoring is usually an iterative process; first-pass requirements can be quite a simple description of required system behaviour, whilst subsequent iterations are used to add detail. Simple EARS is an effective mechanism for the expression of simple requirements, but does not adequately define precise, rigorous requirements. To address these shortcomings, the enhanced EARS+ template has been developed. EARS+ provides a mechanism to vary the level of detail in NL requirements during iterative requirements authoring. The requirement author can add clauses such as stakeholder, action and object, which have defined syntax. This produces a precise description of the required system behaviour. The practitioner can choose which clauses to apply, thereby tailoring each requirement to the appropriate level of detail, whilst maintaining the readability of NL.

This interactive tutorial will introduce the EARS+ approach, illustrate worked examples of both simple and detailed requirements and discuss the benefits of adopting the approach. The afternoon session will allow participants to work on real requirements from their own projects, with support. Participants will leave with a working knowledge of EARS+, having already applied it to their own requirements.

Date
Monday, September 12, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Alistair Mavin
Rolls-Royce PLC, United Kingdom

Alistair Mavin (Mav) is a requirements specialist at Rolls-Royce PLC based in Derby, UK and has carried out systems engineering and requirements engineering projects in a range of industries including defence, aerospace, rail and automotive. He is the lead author of the EARS+ notation and has experience in the development and delivery of requirements engineering training and in innovation and creativity support. Mav has published many papers on requirements and systems engineering, was Industry Chair for RE13 and Industry Laboratory Chair for RE14, is a member of the “RE” conference series Industry Committee, a member of the British Computer Society's (BCS) Requirements Engineering Specialist Group (RESG) committee and is a chartered engineer.


Sabine Teufl
Fortiss GmbH, Germany

Sabine Teufl (Dipl.-Math. oec. (Univ.)) is a staff researcher in the field of requirements engineering at the Technical University Munich, Germany. In her research, she focuses on tooling-aspects of model-based requirements engineering. She applies EARS in the step-wise transition of textual requirements to formal models. In her research projects she has worked with companies in the field of rail automation, automotive, aerospace, cloud computing and insurance. Sabine has experience in industry, undertaking requirements engineering as an optimization software specialist for production planning in the process industry and as an IT consultant for individual business information software. She has authored and co-authored several papers about requirements engineering.

Back to overiew

T03 - Effective User Survey Design and Data Analysis

Software engineers use user surveys to collect data for many purposes such as: testing systems, evaluating theory, and eliciting requirements. Unfortunately, for software engineers and computer scientists, designing user surveys is not as simple as compiling a list of questions that seem reasonable to the investigator. Survey design should leverage the wealth of theory that informs whether a proposed survey measures what is claimed to be measured. For example, engineering researchers studying methods often default to measuring the time of completion or the number of tasks achieved to evaluate a proposed solution. Alternatively, the engineering problems are rich with human-subject-relevant phenomena that can advance our knowledge in requirements engineering. Furthermore, researchers in psychology and the social sciences have discovered foundational theories that can be used as guidelines to create surveys and experiments to access that knowledge.

In this tutorial, we introduce the audience to relevant social science theories and show how they can be applied in survey design. Students will learn this application using a sample survey in class where they apply what they have learned. We aim to teach the community about the challenges in user survey design and how to address these challenges and reduce bias. We also explain the different scales and metrics in surveys, and we discuss theories from the psychometrics field behind choosing scales for the construct of interest in a survey. We base our survey design techniques on well-known methods in the social science community aimed at increasing conclusion reliability.

In addition, this tutorial will explain different analysis techniques for survey data. We will explain different types of statistical tests their differences, and how we choose the appropriate test. We will explore topics like: sampling, test conditions, assumptions, and statistical power. We briefly explain qualitative approaches like grounded analysis to analyze qualitative data in surveys and how it can complement quantitative findings. We will also explain how to present findings from user surveys in research papers and how to report the statistics.

Date
Monday, September 12, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Hanan Hibshi
Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Hanan Hibshi is a Ph.D. candidate in the Societal Computing program at Carnegie Mellon University. Hanan’s research area includes: usable security, security requirements and expert’s decision-making. Hanan’s research involves using grounded theory and mixed-methods user experiments to extract rules for use in intelligent systems. Hanan received her MS in Information Security Technology and Management from the Information Networking Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, and the BS in Computer Science from King Abdul-Aziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.


Travis D. Breaux
Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Travis D. Breaux is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received the Ph.D. in Computer Science from North Carolina State University in May of 2009. Dr. Breaux's research includes mixed-methods design, including grounded theory to discover ontologies, formalisms for expressing problems, and cognitive models that explain how humans perform analysis. Dr. Breaux is a 2015 NSF CAREER award recipient for his privacy and security requirements research, and he is a regular member of the IFIP Working Group 2.9 on Requirements Engineering.

Back to overiew

T04 - User Story Best Practices: Requirements in Agile Context

The widespread adoption of agile methods like Scrum, Kanban and XP has lead to the rise of user stories in industry. Although 45% of practitioners employ user stories for requirements gathering (Kassab, 2015), many still struggle with effectively applying this method in practice. This is signified by the high degree of errors in existing user stories: almost 50% (Lucassen et al., 2016). Participate in this tutorial to learn about innovative theories, methods and tools based on best practices among 20+ companies to support you in creating better user stories. In this tutorial, you will learn:

  • the basics of creating user stories
  • effectively embedding user stories in existing agile development processes
  • improving user story quality with the Quality User Story Framework and AQUSA tool
  • consistency checking with Visual Narrator
  • insight in best practices of 20+ softwarecompanies employing user stories

At the end of this tutorial you will have the knowledge and resources to start applying user stories in your software development projects.

Participants are encouraged to bring existing sets of user stories available from projects they or someone else in their organization participated in. Please contact the tutorial presenters up-front with these materials for entering in the tooling: g.lucassen@uu.n

Date
Monday, September 12, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Garm Lucassen, MSc
Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Garm Lucassen, MSc is a PhD student at the Centre for Organisation and Information, Utrecht University. His PhD focuses on methods and tools for supporting and improving user story practice. His work on this topic includes the creation of a quality framework, the AQUSA tool and 4 validating experiments in industry. Next to this, he is the coordinator and teacher of the Software Product Management course for professionals at Utrecht University and is member of the extended board of the International Software Product Management Association.


Sjaak Brinkkemper
Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Prof. Sjaak Brinkkemper is full professor of Software Production at the Department of Information and Computing Sciences of Utrecht University, the Netherlands. He leads a group of about twenty-five researchers specialized in product software development and entrepreneurship. The main research themes of the group are methodology of software production, implementation and adoption, and techno-economic aspects of the software industry. Brinkkemper has published about 10 books and over 170 papers.

Back to overiew

T06 - Security Requirements Engineering

Security is a core issue in socio-technical systems, i.e., complex systems composed of human and technical (e.g., software) subsystems that interact in order to achieve their objectives. As such, security requirements engineering should consider not only technical concerns but also social and organizational aspects.

In this tutorial, we present STS: a comprehensive method that spans from the early phases of requirements engineering—where the security requirements are expressed—to the specification of secure business processes, where security mechanisms are chosen to fulfill the requirements.

Two types of models will be explained: STS-ml models to describe security requirements and SecBPMN2 models to explain how these requirements are operationalized into business processes. STS modeling is done via the STS-Tool that features reasoning techniques about consistency, conflicts, and compliance.

The tutorial will be hands-on: the participants will be learning while creating security requirements models using STS-Tool on their own laptop.

Date
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Mattia Salnitri
University of Trento, Italy

Mattia Salnitri is a post-doctoral researcher at department of Information Engineering and Computer Science of University of Trento, Italy. He received his PhD in computer science from University of Trento in 2016. His research interests cover security, privacy, business processes and socio-technical systems.


Elda Paja
University of Trento, Italy

Elda Paja is a post-doctoral researcher is a post-doctoral researcher at the Dept. of Information Engineering and Computer Science of University of Trento, Italy. Her research interests include security requirements engineering and modeling, automated reasoning, privacy, and trust. She serves in the program committee of RE:Next!, REFSQ, ReLaw, P&D @RE, iStar.


Paolo Giorgini
University of Trento, Italy

Paolo Giorgini is associate professor and head of the Software Engineering, Formal Methods and Security group at the Department of Engineering and Computer Science of University of Trento. His research focuses on the development of requirements and design languages, and the application of agent and goal-oriented techniques to (security) software analysis. He is a co-founder of Tropos, an agent-oriented software engineering methodology. His publication list includes more than 180 refereed journal and conference proceedings papers and 12 edited books.


Fabiano Dalpiaz
Utrecht University, The Netherlands

Fabiano Dalpiaz is an assistant professor in the Dept. of Information and Computing Sciences of Utrecht University in the Netherlands. His research in RE focuses on security, automated reasoning, gamification, and agile requirements. He serves on the program committee of CAiSE, ER, REFSQ, RE:Next!, MODELS, AAMAS.

Back to overiew

T07 - Modeling and Analysis with the User Requirements Notation 2.0: Features, Goals, and Scenarios

The User Requirements Notation (URN), standardized by ITU-T in 2008 with extensive improvements in 2012, offers two complementary views for modeling requirements including features and business processes: GRL (the Goal-oriented Requirement Language) for stakeholder goals, features, and indicators, and UCM (Use Case Maps) for scenarios and high-level architectures. This tutorial first gives an introduction to the basic concepts and notations of URN, together with a comprehensive analysis approach to requirements modeling, combining both views. Illustrative examples are demonstrated with jUCMNav, a mature Eclipse-based environment that supports URN and combined goal-scenario capabilities.

The second part of the tutorial focuses on indicators (a recent concept in the standard that makes real-life measures available for reasoning within URN models), metadata and user-defined constraints for profiling URN to specific domains, and on the latest integration of feature model analysis into a holistic URN reasoning framework. These powerful mechanisms enable advanced and yet concise modeling in a wide range of application domains.

Throughout the tutorial, participants will do exercises to deepen their understanding of URN.

Date
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Daniel Amyot
University of Ottawa, Canada

Daniel Amyot is Professor at the University of Ottawa, with 160+ publications related to his research areas: requirements modeling and analysis with goals, scenarios, features and aspects; business process management; software engineering; regulatory compliance; and medical informatics. Daniel co-edited with Gunter Mussbacher all versions of the URN standard, and he also leads the development of an open-source Eclipse plug-in (jUCMNav) for the creation, analysis, and transformation of URN models. Daniel, who was General Chair of RE’15, has given numerous tutorials and invited presentations on various topics related to URN at international conferences, at ITU-T, at departmental seminars, and in government and industry events (http://www.eecs.uottawa.ca/~damyot/).


Gunter Mussbacher
McGill University, Canada

Gunter Mussbacher is an Assistant Professor at McGill University, with 100+ publications related to his research areas: model-driven requirements engineering with goals, features and scenarios; modularity in modeling; concern-driven development and reuse; and sustainability engineering. Gunter co-edited with Daniel Amyot all versions of the URN standard, and contributes regularly to jUCMNav (an open-source Eclipse plug-in for URN modeling). Gunter is an organizer and PC member for numerous conferences and workshops (e.g., RE, MODELS, SLE, MoDRE, MOMO, MiSE, SAM, SDL Forum) and has given many tutorials and invited talks on various topics related to URN at international conferences, at departmental seminars, and in government (http://www.ece.mcgill.ca/~gmussb1/).

Back to overiew

T08 - Writing Good Requirements

Poor requirements practices are widely recognized as one of the top causes of product defects, project delays, and cost overruns. Yet, a practical solution that balances effective results with the everyday pressures of product development can be hard to find. Teams struggle with questions such as “How much detail is enough?”, “What is the difference between requirements and design”, and “What requirements practices are right for my project?”

Writing Good Requirements is based on a popular and successful course taught to thousands of students at Intel. It covers effective best practices for specifying requirements that work even for complex, market-driven products. The techniques presented are scalable and have been employed on projects within both agile and traditional methodologies. Rather than presenting a rigid methodology or process, the emphasis is on best practices that can be tailored to a variety of product and project types.

The tutorial contains examples from actual requirements documents in original and improved formats. Small-group exercises and discussions reinforce the content and techniques through the day.

Date
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 (Full-day)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenter

Sarah C. Gregory
Intel Corporation, USA

Sarah C. Gregory is a Senior Requirements Engineer at Intel Corporation, coordinating cross-Intel RE methods and practices work through an innovative division, Freelance Nation. In addition to deep dive engagements with different Intel organizations (currently Datacenter Strategic Planning), Sarah develops and mentors Requirements Engineering subject matter experts across Intel worldwide, conducts training, and trains many course trainers. This tutorial is an externally-approved version of a class that has been taught to over 20,000 Intel employees, and that will be available online in late 2016 through the IEEE Computer Society. She is an Industry representative to the Steering Committee for the International IEEE RE Conference series. Sarah’s academic background includes graduate degrees in Law, Information Science, and Systematic Theology, and she is currently pursuing a doctorate in Social Theory.

Back to overiew

T09 - Applying Model Driven Engineering and Domain Specific Languages to Requirements Engineering

Model Driven Engineering (MDE) brings together multiple technologies and critical innovations and formalizes them into effective tools and approaches for all phases of Software Engineering. Requirements Engineering is a perfect candidate as a target for MDE technologies and when properly done can set the groundwork for a stable, effective and fast development cycle. The result of effective application of MDE to Requirements Engineering dovetails synergistically with other MDE work done throughout the software development lifecycle. This tutorial will cover the basic patterns, principles and practices of MDE and how they can be effectively applied to the concerns of Requirements Engineering. The three main MDE categories include the development of Domain Specific Languages (DSL), Domain Specific Editors (and Views), and Domain Specific Transformation Engines or Generators. Expressed in terms of language development technology, these mirror the development of the Abstract Syntax, Concrete Syntax and Semantics of a new Domain Specific Language.

This tutorial will cover the basic effective patterns, principles and practices for developing these MDE software artifacts and particularly in the context of eliciting, capturing, prototyping, analyzing, verifying and tracing software requirements for complex domains. The tutorial will show how to apply these concepts as effective means with which to both raise levels of abstraction and domain specificity and thus increase power and value of tools and languages that allow developers to tackle the complexities of today’s system and software requirements. It will also show how to effectively leverage abstraction without sacrificing the ability to robustly and precisely refine these abstractions to solve complex real world requirements problems.

This tutorial will also include how to integrate the MDE Requirements Engineering artifacts with other software development artifacts and techniques so as to have a holistically consistent software systems and development. It will show how to simultaneously leverage MDE and Agile Software Development to all aspects of Requirements Engineering. To show these patterns and principles in action, this tutorial will cover the details of how to leverage MDE Language Workbenches and frameworks.

Date
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 (Half-day - Morning)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenters

Bruce Trask
MDE Systems, USA and Netherlands

Bruce Trask has been developing real world complex Distributed Real-Time Embedded systems for over 30 years specializing in Model Driven Engineering as applied to these systems in the last 12 years.  He has been involved with the entire lifecycle of most of the projects he has participated in from conception, through requirements, development, testing, integration, fielding and support. MDE Systems specializes in Model Driven Engineering and Domains Specific Languages. He is a regular speaker/presenter at international software industry conferences.  He has delivered tutorials at the OMG.  Bruce Trask is the CEO and CTO of MDE Systems Inc.


Angel Roman
MDE Systems, USA

Angel Roman is the Chief Software Architect of MDE Systems and an expert on the Eclipse Development environment and its application frameworks and modeling frameworks.   He has presented at various industry conferences on topics such as Software Defined Radios and MDE Technologies. He has been involved with projects concerning MDE, Eclipse Development, Embedded Linux Systems and OSGi.

Back to overiew

T10 - Variability-Oriented Requirements Engineering

Product-Line Engineering has become a rather common approach to software engineering. It aims at creating an integrated set of assets that support the development of a range of products in an integral way. In this tutorial, we will focus on the early phases of product line engineering, namely defining the scope of the product line and modeling its variability.

The main emphasis of the tutorial will be on variability analysis and modeling as it is a core activity that differentiates product line requirements engineering from single system RE. We will provide an overview of different approaches to modeling product line variability. A major part of the tutorial will focus on representing variability modeling using the EASy-approach for modeling variability.

As a result the participants will gain a better understanding of the specific issues in requirements engineering for product lines and will get initial experience of how to do variability management.

Date
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 (Half-day - Afternoon)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenter

Klaus Schmid
University of Hildesheim, Germany

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schmid holds a professorship for software engineering at the University of Hildesheim. He was also a visiting researcher with SEC, South Korea for four years. This inspired his current interest in Global Requirements Engineering. He is active in the areas of Requirements Engineering and Product Line Engineering since the mid-nineties. He is currently vice-chair of the Requirements Engineering group of the German Computer Science Society (GI e.V.).

Klaus Schmid is active in the scientific community since the late nineties and authored numerous papers related to requirements engineering, product management and product line engineering. He also served in numerous scientific roles (general chair, program chair, etc.). Currently, he is also chair of the steering committee of the software product line conference (SPLC). Besides being a researcher, he is also active in consulting both for small and large companies since the late nineties.

Back to overiew

T11 - Product Management Essentials

Successful product development means to deliver the right products or solutions at the right time for the right markets. It all depends on a good understanding of markets and needs and translating those to business models for software and IT. In this tutorial I will explain the essentials of product management and how to apply them to your own business.It provides a practical training on software product management based on “best practices” in companies. Covering the entire product life-cycle it offers a reference framework split into the five phases of inception, development, market launch, deployment and service. For each of these phases the tutorial offers a well-balanced program of overview, short case studies and mutual learning in interactive sessions and discussions. It provides insight into best practices around strategy building, translating strategy into a project vision, portfolio management, requirements elicitation, creating and managing the project business case, prioritizing requirements, customer and market interaction, uncertainty management, project execution, quality assurance, release management, service delivery and support.

Sustainable success comes from a lasting user experience, and this is defined upstream during product management. Join the tutorial and benefit from product management essentials and experiences in companies and industries from around the world.

Date
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 (Half-day - Afternoon)
Flyer
Dowload the flyer (A4 | US Letter).
Presenter

Christof Ebert
Vector, Germany

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world to sustainably improve product strategy and product development and to manage organizational changes. He serves on advisory bodies and is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and Sorbonne in Paris. Prior to that, he held international management positions for fifteen years in a Fortune 100 company.

A worldwide leader in product management coaching, Dr. Ebert will illustrate the essentials of product management with lots of practical experiences. Over the years he had improved product management in many companies and educated hundreds of product managers. He is the author of the book "Global Software and IT" published by Wiley and IEEE in 2012.

Back to overiew

Organizers

Tutorial Co-Chair

Jane Hayes
University of Kentucky, USA

Tutorial Co-Chair

Seok-Won Lee
Ajou University, Republic of Korea